Conversations with Katie

A monthly conversation with LeadingAge president and CEO Katie Smith Sloan.

Recent Activity

Echo Our Voices on Capitol Hill

The policy challenges confronting LeadingAge members in a new Administration are daunting. It is truly a new day in Washington and we must re-frame our advocacy messages to reflect this new reality. We have listened to our members and state partners about their concerns and we are focusing on 3 primary issues: Preserving the financing ...

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  1. Courage and Wisdom

    This past weekend, I took a long walk through American history. It started near the Marine Corps Barracks where a flag with but 15 stars has flown since 1801. The stars signified the number of states that existed when Thomas Jefferson took his oath of office. My path then took me past the United ...

  2. Speaking in Surround Sound

    We are navigating tailwinds, headwinds, and crosswinds simultaneously. On the one hand, there has never been a more challenging time to be in aging services. On the other, opportunities abound in a society that is rapidly aging. As we approach the New Year, we are warming our voices and fine tuning our pitch to make ...

  3. Building the New

    Last week, I spent 5 days in Indianapolis for the LeadingAge Annual Meeting and EXPO with more than 6,500 members, partners, sponsors, and friends. It was another tremendous event where aging services professionals from all corners of the country - and world - came together to celebrate the journey that unites us all: aging. ...

  4. Punching Above Our Weight

    I recently heard a member remark "we need to write the book we want to read," which made me reflect on the power of the collective LeadingAge narrative.As mission-driven, dynamic, aging services organizations, you have the ability to influence the social fabric of your communities and the well-being of individuals and families. ...

  5. Honoring Workers on Labor Day

    I recently read about a vacation resort hotel that is closing before the end of the season because they simply can’t attract an adequate amount of staff to operate. I cringed at a story about public health nurses working at half their staff capacity against increased needs. And, I read still more about small towns, schools, ...