Who Should Apply for the $3,000 Health Equity Award?

CFAR | March 28, 2017 | by Geralyn Magan

Are you thinking about nominating someone for the new Award for Health Equity, which will be presented at this year’s LeadingAge Annual Meeting and Expo? Then be sure to check out the March/April issue of LeadingAge Magazine.

Are you thinking about nominating someone for the new Award for Health Equity, which will be presented at this year’s LeadingAge Annual Meeting and Expo?

Then be sure to check out the March/April issue of LeadingAge magazine. Alisha Sanders, director of housing and services policy research at LeadingAge, explains the award and offers suggestions about who should be nominated.

“Nominees should be able to demonstrate that they have sought a way to increase access to services, supports and opportunities that enable older people to lead healthy lives,” says Sanders in the magazine interview.

What Kind of Solutions is LeadingAge Looking For?

The $3,000 Award for Health Equity will recognize a nominee’s successful efforts to reduce the health disparities that some older adults experience each day. The following types of program could qualify an individual or team of 2 individuals for the award, says Sanders:

A program might increase an older person’s access to formal health care services, like primary care. This could be accomplished through a variety of avenues, such as helping older adults:

  • Access transportation to health offices and clinics,
  • Navigate the health care or insurance system,
  • Understand a doctor’s orders, or
  • Take steps to manage a chronic disease.

The program might collaborate with community partners to:

  • Address social factors, like lack of access to healthy foods, that could be standing in the way of better health for older adults;
  • Reduce isolation that often leads to physical and mental health issues;
  • Address cultural barriers to using needed physical or mental health services;
  • Improve access to physical fitness activities that can help older adults maintain or improve physical function;
  • Enhance the quality, safety and accessibility of housing;
  • Ensure that the needs of vulnerable older adults are considered during local conversations about community planning or public health.

The program must demonstrate success in changing systems. This means that the program should be designed to help improve systems for promoting good health. To accomplish this goal, the program should:

  • Involve community partners or cross-sector collaboration,
  • Lead to sustainable change, and
  • Have the potential to be adopted and scaled.

For More Information

For more information about the Award for Health Equity, read Sanders’ interview with LeadingAge magazine, or contact Sanders (asanders@leadingage.org) directly.

LeadingAge member organizations can use the online application form to nominate an individual or a 2-person team for this year’s RWJF Award for Health Equity. Deadline for nominations is April 30.