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Center for Applied Research News and Events

Updates on our newest reports and other products.

 

Featured Content

What do Preliminary Member Survey Results Say about HCBS?

Preliminary findings from a pilot survey of LeadingAge members in 3 states show that providers of home and community-based services are often considerably larger organizations than those that do not provide HCBS.

What Makes a Home Health Worker Want to Leave a Job?

A new analysis of 2 national data sets could help providers of home and community-based services better understand what contributes to job satisfaction among home health aides and what makes these workers want to leave the job. The results from research conducted by the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research and Social and Scientific Systems were presented at the 68th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America in November.

New Guides Identify Competencies for Mid-Level Managers and Frontline Staff

The LeadingAge Center for Applied Research (CFAR) and the LeadingAge Workforce Cabinet recently released 2 new Competency Development Guides that identify the skill sets for mid-level managers and personal care attendants working across the full continuum of staff positions and settings in the field of long-term care.

Robyn Stone: How Research and Investment Can Prevent Falls

It’s not that we don’t have good ideas for reducing the rate of falls among older adults. We simply lack the willingness to invest in those ideas. That’s the main takeaway from a recent blog that Robyn Stone, executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research, wrote for the December edition of the Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) Health and Housing Expert Forum.  div.PageContent { margin: 20px; color: #444444; font-family: Arial,Verdana,sans-serif; } img.ErrorLogo { float: left; margin: 0 10px 0 0; } div.PageContent h1 { font-size: 22px; padding: 50px 0 0; } div.PageContent p { font-size: 12px; }

How to Combat Loneliness in Residential Care Settings

Resident engagement and peer support can be more effective than traditional activities programs in addressing loneliness and depression among residents of nursing homes, assisted living settings, and retirement communities. That’s the conclusion of a new paper co-authored by Robyn Stone, executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research.